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Epistrophe Examples

Epistrophe, also known as epiphora, is a rhetorical device that consists of repeating a sequence of words at the end of of successive phrases, clauses or sentences to give them emphasis. This stylistic device is contrasted with anaphora which consists of repeating words at the beginning of clauses. When observed keenly, the use of epistrophe examples create a particular pattern and gives rise to an ease of familiarity. Epistrophe can be found in a variety of works including literature, music and even sacred texts such as the Bible.

For example:
-Swearing oath in court - "I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth".
-Abraham Lincoln in the Gettysburg Address. "... this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

- William Shakespeare's The Tempest. "Hourly joys be still upon you! Juno sings her blessings on you. . . . Scarcity and want shall shun you, Ceres' blessing so is on you."

-The Apostle Paul, in the Bible. "When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child." Corinthians 13:11
Epistrophe Meaning
Epistrophe is a rhetorical terms for the repetition of a word or a phrase used at the end of a clause or a sentence. Epistrophe also has other names like epiphora or antistrophe. When observed keenly, the use of ephistrophe examples create a particular pattern and gives rise to an ease of familiarity.
Epistrophe Examples
I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.